Tag Archives: duck

Birds I Photographed for the First Time in 2019. And the Story behind the Pictures.

Hi folks!

This is my first post in 2020 so let me wish you a Happy New Year!

Back to 2019 I can say it was a fruitful year for me from a photographic point of view. On the one hand I learned new stuff like the Ansel Adams Zone┬áSystem or using the back button for auto-focus (BBAF). On the other hand I had the opportunity to shoot interesting subjects for the first time, some of which I haven’t even seen or heard of before. Most of these are birds and in this post I would like to say a few words about each of these beautiful beings. So let’s get started!

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Birds (5)

Hi guys,

Welcome to my first post for this year! I’ll get back to birds, which has gradually become one of my favorite photographic subjects. To compare it with macro photography it is somehow more relaxing and the success rate might in specific cases be higher. I say specific cases referring to still birds because birds-in-flight (BIF) is a completely different story (for me it is still in many respects an uncharted territory).

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Birds (2)

My previous post about birds (https://callofnatureblog.wordpress.com/2014/12/12/birds/) contained pictures taken in the warm season. Now, as winter “officially” began (solstice), I think it would be a good idea to go back “into the white”.

Before it’s getting cold, many birds fly to warmer places, while others remain to endure the frost. The seagulls, wild ducks and even crows belong to the last type. And if they find a small pond where they can get fish, this can be seen as a true haven.

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Birds

Birds are a fascinating subject for nature photographers (and not only!). There can be many reasons for this: their flight, their grace, beautiful colors, the fact that it’s hard to “shoot” them and sometimes you have to wait hours and even days to get a good photo, and so on. In many situations patience, camouflage and quick reaction from the photographer are crucial.

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